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Energy Market and 6 Types of Renewable Energy [Infographic]

Energy Market and 6 Types of Renewable Energy [Infographic]

Renewable energy is energy from the earth’s natural resources that are not finite or exhaustible (wind and sunlight). Renewable energy is an alternative to traditional energy that relies on fossil fuels and is not harmful to the environment. (eco-friendly)

Energy Market and Types of Renewable Energy

6 Types of Renewable Energy

  1. Solar

Solar energy is energy from sunlight and converting it into heat, electricity, or hot water. Photovoltaic (PV) systems can convert direct sunlight into electricity through the use of solar cells.

Benefits of Solar Energy

One of the benefits of solar energy is that sunlight is endless. There is a limitless supply of solar energy. Relying on solar energy rather than fossil fuels also helps us improve public health and environmental conditions.

Solar energy could also eliminate energy costs, and reduce your energy bills. Many countries help the investment in solar energy by providing rebates or tax credits.

  1. Wind

Wind farms capture the energy of wind flow by using turbines and converting it into electricity. There are many systems to convert wind energy.

Commercial-grade wind-powered generating systems can power many different organizations. Single-wind turbines are used to help supplement pre-existing energy organizations.

Another form is utility-scale wind farms, which are purchased by contract or wholesale.

Benefits of Wind Energy

Wind energy is a clean energy source, which means that it doesn’t pollute the air like other forms of energy. Wind energy doesn’t produce carbon dioxide or release any harmful products that can cause environmental degradation or negatively affect human health like smog, acid rain, etc.

Investment in wind energy technology can also open up new avenues for jobs and job training, as the turbines on farms need to be serviced and maintained to keep running.

  1. Hydroelectric

Dams are what people most associate with when it comes to hydroelectric power. Water flows through the dam’s turbines to produce electricity, known as pumped-storage hydropower. Run-of-river hydropower uses a channel to funnel water through rather than powering it through a dam.

Benefits of Hydroelectric Energy

Hydroelectric power is very versatile and can be generated using both large-scale projects (like the Hoover Dam) and small-scale projects like underwater turbines and lower dams on small rivers and streams.

Hydroelectric power does not generate pollution, and therefore is a much more environmentally-friendly energy option for our environment.

  1. Geothermal

Geothermal heat is heat that is trapped beneath the earth’s crust from the formation of the Earth 4.5 billion years ago and radioactive decay. Sometimes large amounts of this heat escape naturally, but all at once, resulting in familiar occurrences, such as volcanic eruptions and geysers.

This heat can be captured and used to produce geothermal energy by using steam that comes from the heated water pumping below the surface, which then rises to the top and can be used to operate a turbine.

Benefits of Geothermal Energy

Geothermal energy is not as common as other types of renewable energy sources, but it has a significant potential for energy supply. Since it can be built underground, it leaves very little footprint on the land.

  1. Hydrogen

Hydrogen needs to be combined with other elements, such as oxygen to make water as it does not occur naturally as a gas on its own. When hydrogen is separated from another element it can be used for both fuel and electricity.

Benefits of Hydrogen Energy

Hydrogen can be used as a clean-burning fuel, which leads to less pollution and a cleaner environment. It can also be used for fuel cells which are similar to batteries and can be used for powering an electric motor.

  1. Biomass

Bioenergy is renewable energy derived from biomass. Biomass is organic matter that comes from recently living plants and organisms. Using wood in your fireplace is an example of biomass that most people are familiar with.

There are various methods used to generate energy through the use of biomass. This can be done by burning biomass or harnessing methane gas which is produced by the natural decomposition of organic materials in ponds or even landfills.

Benefits of Biomass Energy

The use of biomass in energy production creates carbon dioxide that is put into the air, but the regeneration of plants consumes the same amount of carbon dioxide, which is said to create a balanced atmosphere.

Biomass can be used in many different ways in our daily lives, not only for personal use but for businesses as well. In 2017, energy from biomass made up about 5% of the total energy used in the U.S.

These days people can improve the environment with greener energy solutions (Renewable Energy). If you’re a homeowner, you can install solar panels in your home.

Solar panels not only reduce your energy costs but help improve your standard of living with a safer, more eco-friendlier energy choice that doesn’t depend on resources that harm the environment.

There are also alternatives for a greener way of life offered by your electric companies.

More Details https://justenergy.com

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Investments in Alternative Energy: The Energy Future is Green

It is possible to have a portfolio which profitably invests in alternative energy funds. “Green” energy production is expected to be a multi-billion industry by 2017.

The most recently developed wind-turbine technologies have brought us wind-produced energy which is more cost efficient as well as more widespread. More state-of-the-art wind energy technologies are typically more market competitive with conventional energy technologies. Wind energy production is a growing technology, and companies engaged in it would make up an excellent part of a growth or aggressive growth portfolio.

Next to consider are solar cell, or photovoltaic cell, technologies. These are to be found implemented in pocket calculators, private property lights, and other areas. More and more they find their way onto the roofs of housing and commercial buildings and building complexes. Cost is falling. Their energy efficiency (the ratio of the amount of work needed to cause their energy production versus the actual energy production) is steadily on the rise. As an example, the conversion efficiency of silicon cells has increased from a mere four percent in 1982 to over 25% for the latest technologies. Photovoltaic cells create absolute zero pollution as they are generating electrical power. However, photovoltaic cellls are not presently as cost effective as “utility produced” electricity. “PV” cells are not [capable at present for producing industrial-production amounts of electricity due to their present constraints on space. However, areas where photovoltaic cell arrays could be implemented are increasingly available. In sum, costs are going down while efficiency is rising for this alternative fuel technology.

Many alternative energy investment portfolio advisors are confident that alternative energies derived from currents, tidal movement, and temperature differentials are poised to become a new and predominant form of clean energy. The French are actually fairly advanced at hydro power generation, and numerous studies are being made in Scotland and the US along these sames lines. Some concerns center around the problems with the deterioration of metals in salt water, marine growth such as barnacles, and violent storms which have all been disruptions to energy production in the past. However, these problems for the most part seem to be cured through the use of different, better materials. Ocean-produced energy has a huge advantage because the timing of ocean currents and waves are well understood and reliable.

Investments in hydro-electric technology have grown in the last two decades. Hydro-electric power is clean; however, it’s also limited by geography. While already prominent as power generation, the large, older dams have had problems with disturbing marine life. Improvements have been made on those dams in order to protect marine life, but these improvements have been expensive. Consequently, more attention is now being paid to low-impact “run-of-the-river” hydro-power plants, which do not have these ecological problems.
What is Alternative Energy. Why it’s a wise invest
There is a lot of energy that we can harness if we only seek to research and develop the technologies needed to do so. We can get away from the fossil fuels and the old electrical grids by turning to alternatives to these energy sources.

One of these alternative energy resources is wind power. Wind turbines continue to be developed that are progressively more energy efficient and less costly. “Wind farms” have been springing up in many nations, and they have even become more strategically placed over time so that they are not jeopardizing birds as former wind turbines did.

Another alternative energy resource is the one that is most well known: solar energy. This involves the manufacturing of solar cells which gather and focus the energy given off directly by the sun, and translate it into electricity or, in some cases, hot water. As with wind energy, solar energy creates absolutely zero pollution.

Ocean wave energy is seen by governments and investors as having enormous energy generating potential. A generator in France has been in operation for many years now and is considered to be a great success, and the Irish and Scots are running experimental facilities.

Hydroelectric power has been with us for a while and where it is set up, it is a powerful generator of electricity and cleaner than a grid. However, there are certain limitations to the availability of the right places to set up a large dam. Many run-of-the-river, or small and localized, hydroelectric generators have been set up in recent times due to this limitation.

The reality is, the energy future is green, and investors would do well to put their money out wisely, with that advice in their minds.